Matching Skills Demand and Skills Development for Employment in Africa

Jobs for Youth & Women
Pavillon Congo
16:00 to 17:00

By 2050, one third of the world’s youth population will live in Africa. Fast growing economies require flexible skills with strong investments in human capital to educate, train, support people throughout their life and career. The challenge is to connect the workforce to the needs of the economies, to integrate youth in the labour market, to promote initiatives and enterprises, to set up agile systems to face industrial switch and technology breakthrough, to be always ready to grasp growth opportunities and offer the workers the possibility to be part of the transformation.
 
Business and Academics address in common the Youth and Employment stakes. Inadequately skilled workforces are a major constraint to businesses. Yet today, Africa is not making the most of its human potential capital and is underprepared for the impact of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.
 
In this new world order, driven by artificial intelligence and greater automation, there is evidence of strong demand for science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects as well as information technology and communication skills across a number of industries in Africa. Critical thinking, creativity and emotional intelligence will also be needed.

Questions for debate include:

  • How can governments and private sector stakeholders work together to better understand the evolving skills base and emerging employment scenarios?
  • What progress is being made on Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET), and other educational interventions. Are there any south-south lessons from countries like Brazil?
  • Which sectors most affected by the skills shortage, and what specific interventions are required?